Photography by Gustav Almestal. Styling by Niklas Hansen. Originally for The Gourmand.
Photography by Gustav Almestal. Styling by Niklas Hansen. Originally for The Gourmand.
Photography by Gustav Almestal. Styling by Niklas Hansen. Originally for The Gourmand.

True To Me Too features an interview with Niklas Hansen, a food stylist who sees ingredients with the eye of an artist, helping create dramatic, conceptually-driven images like the ones shown here, which might be more at home on display at the MoMA than in the pages of a cookbook.

Photography by Gustav Almestal. Styling by Niklas Hansen. Originally for The Gourmand.
Photography by Gustav Almestal. Styling by Niklas Hansen. Originally for The Gourmand.

Hansen describes some of the work he’s been doing with clients ranging from food and culture magazine The Gourmand to a company manufacturing high-end, premium kitchen products with astronomical price tags and advertising budgets. Among other subjects, he also touches on the tools employed by the food stylist:

From what I’ve read it sounds like food stylists use a lot of tools to make the food look perfect, what kind of tools or instruments do you use?

I have many different types of (makes pinching motion with his hands) what do you call that in English?

Tweezers?

Tweezers! Yes, tweezers. I have many different sets of tweezers, scissors, knives, razors, glue, needles, pencils to dip in oil or water. I’ve got 20 of each, they all differ a little.

When you were starting out did someone say hey you should get all these tools or over the course of time did you think oh maybe this tool would help on this job and you slowly accumulated all your instruments?

When I started I got one tweezer, one pencil, one knife, one pair of scissors, and that worked fine for many years. But my kit sort of grew with all the projects.

 

 

The short URL of the present article is: https://wp.me/p3KoEv-28M

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